Dispute over competition regulation seen as debate over democracy

The link between market competition and democracy is creating an intellectual tug-of-war between progressives and their conservative counterparts.

Neill Averitt

The great fashion-model conspiracy

The antitrust profession thinks of labor cases as a recent policy innovation. But on the important topic of wage collusion, they date back several decades, at least to the Federal Trade Commission’s memorable case against the great fashion-model conspiracy of 1993.

Current Issue: 989

Critics zero in on FTC for green-lighting Instagram takeover

There was a telling exchange during the heated Capitol Hill hearing at which tech CEOs testified when Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg was pressed on whether he paid $1 billion for Instagram in 2012 to...

Volkswagen's $9.5 billion settlement over deceptive ads offers sobering lesson

It's hard to blame the Federal Trade Commission for spiking the ball to celebrate completing the largest consumer redress program ever, in which Volkswagen forked over more than $9.5 billion for...

FTC oversight hearing dominated by video glitches, Big Tech concerns

Members of the Federal Trade Commission disagreed on policy issues while appearing virtually before a Senate panel, but saw eye to eye on one thing: technology can cause problems.

E-commerce transparency seen as antidote to bogus goods in new congressional bills

Online sellers trading in high volumes of merchandise could be subject to Federal Trade Commission transparency requirements under new House and Senate legislation.

Amid coronavirus, digital push, FTC reviews health data rule

As the coronavirus pandemic shifts more attention toward medical privacy and health apps grow in popularity, the Federal Trade Commission is in the midst of reviewing its Health Breach Notification...

Elmer exits DOJ for fresh start in corporate law

Having grown up in the football-obsessed state of Alabama, Julie Elmer made a name for herself quarterbacking the trial teams in antitrust cases at the Department of Justice.